Like many Coloradans, you had to end your marriage. If your divorce was acrimonious or downright nasty, your former spouse may have lingering resentment. He or she should not use anger or other reasons to turn the young ones in your family against you, though. While no parent is perfect, parental alienation is off-limits in the Centennial State. 

Parental alienation occurs when one parent manipulates the kids to harm their relationship with the other parent. In Colorado, parental alienation constitutes emotional abuse. That is, it runs directly counter to the best interests of the children. Fortunately, if you suspect your ex-spouse is alienating your kids, you have some options. 

Warning signs 

There is no quintessential example of parental alienation. On the contrary, alienation may take several different forms. For example, your former partner may put you down in front of the kids. Alternatively, he or she may tell your children not to respect your authority. Furthermore, your ex-spouse may exclude you from important parental functions or falsely accuse you of abuse. However parental alienation manifests, it is both unacceptable and hazardous to your relationship with the kids who mean the most to you. 

Legal recourse 

If you believe your spouse is trying to alienate your children, you have legal recourse. Colorado law allows you to request a child family investigator or parental responsibilities evaluator. These professionals can likely provide important insights into the conduct of both parents and their relationship with the kids. Furthermore, if alienation is interfering with court-ordered visitation or other matters, you may seek enforcement of the order. In extreme situations, asking a judge to modify the custody arrangement may be necessary. 

There is never a valid reason for parents to emotionally abuse their children. Because parental alienation is a form of such abuse, you must act quickly to stop it. After all, the overall health and well-being of your children may be in jeopardy.